Great Irish sportspeople abroad: The “Irish Whales”

Great Irish sportspeople abroad: The “Irish Whales”

And so with the 2016 Rio Olympics entering its final couple of days before the Olympic torch is, quite literally, passed over to Tokyo, I thought it would be a good idea to conclude my recent fascination with the extraordinary “Irish Whales”. Having already discussed John Flanagan, Matt McGrath and Martin Sheridan in greater detail, I will be focusing on the lesser-known members of the group. Before that, however, one burning question needs to be addressed first; how did the “Irish Whales” come to be known by their moniker?

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Great Irish sportspeople abroad: Martin Sheridan

Great Irish sportspeople abroad: Martin Sheridan

Martin Sheridan is the most successful Irish-born athlete in Olympic history, having won five golds, three silvers and one bronze medal during a period of four years. Considered the greatest all-round athlete of the first decade of the 20th century, Co. Mayo’s Martin Sheridan is the topic of today’s “great Irish sportspeople abroad” series.

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Jesse Owens: 1936, Hitler & the forgotten snub

Jesse Owens: 1936, Hitler & the forgotten snub

The 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin was Adolf Hitler’s opportunity to showcase Nazi Germany to the world and in particular to promote his ideals of Aryan racial supremacy, through sport. Perversely, the Olympic motto of “faster, higher, stronger” did not sound out of place from the Nazi propaganda being spread at the time.

The German athletes certainly lived up to Hitler’s expectations as they comfortably topped the medals table, winning a total of 89 medals, 33 of which were gold. Despite this, the star athlete of the Games was not a German, but an African-American by the name of Jesse Owens whose four gold medals shattered the Nazi fallacy of Aryan supremacy. As a result Hitler refused to shake his hand, or so the tale goes. Owens was snubbed but not necessarily by Hitler because as is usually the case, history is written (and edited) by the victors. Owens was just as badly treated by his home nation.

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Great Irish sportspeople abroad: Matt McGrath

Great Irish sportspeople abroad: Matt McGrath

Continuing with the theme of the Olympic Games, today’s “Great Irish sportspeople abroad” will focus on another of the extraordinary “Irish Whales”, Matt McGrath. McGrath was the successor to John Flanagan, the subject of yesterday’s post, as the world’s leading hammer thrower. A fellow Munster man, McGrath remained in the top ten in the sport until the age of 50. A three-time Olympic medallist, McGrath was perhaps the most colourful and influential of the “Irish Whales”.

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Great Irish sportspeople abroad: John Flanagan

Great Irish sportspeople abroad: John Flanagan

Pub quiz question: who was Ireland’s first-ever Olympic medallist? The answer, more often than not, is Dr Pat O’Callaghan, who won the hammer throw at the 1928 Amsterdam Games. While it is true O’Callaghan was our country’s first Olympic medallist, he was not the first Irishman to win an Olympic medal.* That honour belongs to another, Limerick’s John Flanagan, who competed under the banner of the United States of America, and is the subject of today’s “Great Irish sportspeople abroad”.

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The ’88 Olympics men’s 100m final: “The dirtiest race in history”

The ’88 Olympics men’s 100m final: “The dirtiest race in history”

In light of the revelations in The Sunday Times yesterday regarding widespread drugs cheating in athletics, I thought would rewrite and update an article I wrote for my university’s newspaper three years ago regarding the most notorious self-contained case of doping in the sport’s history: the men’s 100 metres final at the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

Despite lasting a mere 10 seconds, the men’s 100 metres final is athletics’ blue ribbon event at every Olympic Games. However before Usain Bolt singlehandedly redeemed the race’s reputation after major victories over the last seven years, allegations of past winners doping either during an Olympics or at some point afterwards were becoming as common as they were during cycling’s dark days.

With the exception of Bolt and Donovan Bailey (1996), every 100m winner since 1984 has at some stage in their careers tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs or been caught with the banned substances in their possession. Three of these past “winners”, Ben Johnson, Carl Lewis and Linford Christie, once participated in the same race, the 100m final at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the race has been consequently dubbed “the dirtiest race in history”.

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